The “true friend” test

Just a quick thought. I’ve read a few posts on how to tell if someone is a “true” friends. Most of these articles cite surface-level trite things like, “they always support you”, etc.

I’ve always thought the mark of a true friend was someone who will tell you the truth, even when they know it’s not what you want to hear. That takes courage and caring about someone–be truthful with them even when it hurts.

“Faithful are the wounds of a friend…”

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9 thoughts on “The “true friend” test

  1. And if that person is also a true friend, they will listen to your opinion and hear your concern. If they don’t agree with you, a true friend will know how hard it was for you to share your concern and be glad you were brave enough to tell them the truth.

    Liked by 2 people

  2. Hmm – I come from a family where we always told the truth even if it hurt and then I married into a family where you tended to be more tactful. Having experienced both sides of this I am still not sure which is best. I think it depends on the person and on the circumstance. There are also ways of saying things somewhere in between so you are not so brutally honest, but the recipient can tell what you really think. Things are rarely black and white anyway.

    Liked by 1 person

    • David Howell says:

      Good point. There’s certainly something to be said for “how” truth is delivered. I still feel that a good friend will be honest, but it does help when it’s delivered gently. 😊

      Liked by 1 person

  3. So true – my bestie and I have had difficult conversations out of love and funny ones (while she was coming out of anesthesia – i.e. What is the purpose of that dark lip liner?) LOL! She is my ‘go to’ for the honest truth – however difficult. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  4. tabitha59reachingout says:

    Yes, and it takes a great deal of tact and grace sometimes. I think most of us are more sensitive than we’d like to admit. I am saying that for the truth teller and the truth receiver. It is always good to try to put oneself in the other persons shoes. Easier said than done.

    Liked by 1 person

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